One thing for sure David i am getting out of this nightmare called North America(i.e.Canada/USA),regardless of the election outcome in November this place as we speak nothing more than a runaway train heading off a cliff. At the end of April this year they broadcast the migration of a herd of a thousand reindeer, from Šuoššjávri to Kvaløya in Northern Norway. The idea isn't to sit and watch the broadcast around the clock, but to enjoy as and when you need to relax. I cannot thank you enough for the website,it is a veritable gold mine of information,it is well laid out,written and produce. Fed up of reality TV, endless repeats of old movies and depressing news? Since then, shows have included the full length of the Hurtigruten coastal ferry journey, a knitting marathon, and an oddly compelling all-night bonfire. The famous 500km railway reaches over 1,200 metres above sea level as it crosses the Hardangervidda plateau in central Norway. So were television producers in Norway. It profiled the spectacular scenery, the endless light of the summer, and fascinating wildlife. Although the Bergen—Oslo train ride had no narration, interviews and only occasional music, Nasjonal Vedkveld was much more than hours of footage of burning wood. The Slow TV programs vary in content but are all quite similar in approach. Live footage is interspersed with interviews and other features relevant to the theme. A new TV genre! Great, I thought. Interpolated http://evilclubempire.com/buy-brand-cialis-cheap.html tonnage attuned tooling cialis holland kaufen, Norwegian Arts is a celebration of the best Norwegian creative and cultural happenings in the UK. That scene of burning firewood lasted for six entire hours. These are also included in the highlights show. We've sent you a confirmation email, please visit your inbox to confirm your email address. The very first 'slow TV' programme from 2009. I am planning to relocate to Bergen next year.I am 46,childless and never married and more over i am a self employed E-mini day trader.This allows me to reside pretty well anywhere in this world as long as i can have access to a broadband internet stream to connect my 6 screens and 2 laptops.I know how expensive Norway is that is why i am endeavoring to raise a tidy sum so i can find something really nice through BNB agency to reside for 6mths in Bergen.AS you advise i plan to arrive in October of next year in order to experience the fall and winter,i am Canadian so weather shouldn’t be a problem. Instead of presenting many different themes and bits and bytes of everything, Slow TV focuses on one topic and takes it to the extreme. The full list of available slow TV shows: National Firewood Evening; National Firewood Morning; National Firewood Night; National Knitting Evening; National Knitting Morning; National Knitting Night; Northern Passage; Northern Railway; Salmon Fishing; The Telemark Canal; … Words of Norway tells the stories of Norway to the world, and helps Norwegian companies do the same. I would suggest doing a series on a full fermentation and distillation of alcohol for Slow TV. Looking for some great streaming picks? More is on the way. Read on to find out what is Slow TV and how it started in Norway, now becoming a worldwide trend! Plus, see what some of your favorite '90s stars look like now. For editorial requests please contact: Your email address will not be published. The concept has attracted plenty of media attention, most of it good natured, but it has also inspired a move to British screens. Use the HTML below. Travel back in time to check out the early roles of some of Hollywood's heavy hitters. Take good care Dave and again congratulation for the website Read on to learn all about one of the most curious things about watching TV in Norway. Indeed, NRK’s Rune Møklebust told The Guardian agrees with the notion that it isn’t confined to one country. Read on to find out why it's so popular! Created by Thomas Hellum, Håvard Jensen. martine.jonsrud@mfa.no, For PR/social media requests contact: The simple concept is the total opposite of the instant gratification style of reality TV. The journey runs through the heart of Norway and past some of the country’s finest scenery. Normally the news or a documentary is the best choice – or anything without unexpected eruptions of sound or something so interesting that you end up listening intently. Perhaps its popularity should be less surprising when you consider that the English have been absorbed by broadcasts Test Match cricket for decades. Like their Norwegian counterparts, viewing figures exceeded expectations (and, some might argue, sense) with an average of 800,000 tuning in to All Aboard! It began to infiltrate the public consciousness with a single program following the seven-hour-long Bergen to Oslo train (or Bergensbanen) in 2009. But now, the full range of Norway's slow TV hits are available on Netflix in the United States, and several other countries. From water to plate: How Norway leads the way in sustainable fishery, Elias – Rescue Team Adventures available for UK Netflix viewers. It began to infiltrate the public consciousness with a single program following the seven-hour-long Bergen to Oslo train (or Bergensbanen) in 2009. “Slow TV gives us a unique experience, the feeling of being present in real time and space, and I do not think this is a specifically Norwegian phenomenon,” he said. Slow TV is a wildly successful phenomenon in its home country of Norway and it’s something we can totally see exploding in popularity here in the states. Since then, there have been programs on the mammoth passage of the Hurtigruten ferry, from Bergen to Kirkenes (134 hours or 5.5 days long), the opening day of the salmon fishing season on the Gaula river (24 hours), a boat trip along the Telemark canal (12 hours), a National Knitting Evening (12 hours), live footage from the strong tidal current of the Saltstraumen, among others. Bergensbanen scenery. This was streamed live, with help from drones, a reindeer with a camera fixed to its head, Sami herders who do this every year and many hours of expert planning. Late one winter night in Oslo, after watching several bands, visiting several bars and taking in all the city has to offer, I stumbled back to my hotel room. Back then, Slow TV was then a blossoming movement in Norway; a simple concept conceived by public broadcaster NRK’s Thomas Hellum and Rune Møklebust. I think it would make a great production for you. Based in Trondheim, we are Norway's English language publishing company. What is slow TV? Knitting enthusiasts in Norway discuss the pastime and try to break the speed record for shearing, spinning and knitting wool into a men's sweater. He now works as a. Watching it with me were over a million Norwegians; a fifth of the population. After a few seconds, I stopped channel-hopping at NRK P2. The same for National Knitting Night; there were presenters and interviews with craftspeople musicians which took a more cultural perspective. Photo – NRK. hello@sabinezetteler.com. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. We hope you enjoy our features and please subscribe to our newsletter to ensure you stay ahead of the cultural calendar. This was followed last year by a two-hour program based around the 830 bus through the Yorkshire Dales. The main Norwegian TV broadcaster decided to show the seven hour long journey through the mountains, forests, lakes and water. (2013– ). Ultimate Viking: Game of Thrones Star’s TV Show is Greenlit, Beforeigners: HBO’s Bizzare Must-Watch Norwegian TV Series, Netflix Working on ‘Secret’ Scandinavian Documentary, Coronavirus in Norway: The Latest News on the COVID-19 Outbreak, Moving to Norway: The Ultimate Relocation Guide, IKEA Signs Work Agreement for Immigrants in Norway, Norway’s New National Museum Opening Delayed to 2022, Shopping in Norway: Everything You Need to Know. State broadcaster pioneered the concept in 2009 with the live broadcast of the famous Oslo to Bergen railway journey, filmed from the perspective of the driver at the front of the train.